Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut (or Hatchepsut), meaning Foremost of Noble Ladies, (1508 BC - 1458 BC) was the fifth pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of Ancient Egypt. She is generally regarded by Egyptologists as one of the most successful pharaohs, reigning longer than any other woman of an indigenous Egyptian dynasty. The Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut, the Djeser-Djeseru ("Holy of Holies"), is located beneath the cliffs at Deir el Bahari on the west bank of the Nile near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt. The mortuary temple is dedicated to the sun god Amon-Ra and is located next to the mortuary temple of Mentuhotep II, which served both as an inspiration, and later, a quarry.


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Hatshepsut Temple
Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple



Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple

Memnon Kolosse West Theben

The Colossi of Memnon (known to locals as el-Colossat or es-Salamat) are two massive stone statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III, who reigned during Dynasty XVIII. For the past 3,400 years (since 1350 BC) they have stood in the Theban necropolis, west of the River Nile from the modern city of Luxor. The twin statues depict Amenhotep III (fl. 14th century BC) in a seated position, his hands resting on his knees and his gaze facing eastwards (actually ESE in modern bearings) towards the river. Two shorter figures are carved into the front throne alongside his legs: these are his wife Tiy and mother Mutemwiya. The side panels depict the Nile god Hapy. The statues are made from blocks of quartzite sandstone which was quarried at el-Gabal el-Ahmar (near modern-day Cairo) and transported 675 km (420 mi) overland to Thebes.


Memnon Kolosse West Theben

Memnon Kolosse West Theben

Memnon Kolosse West Theben

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Hatshepsut Temple

Hatshepsut Temple